OECD – is populism a response to the OECD failing to follow its own mandate?

In researching some issues on digital taxation I looked at the 2003 OECD paper “Implementation of Ottawa Tax Framework Conditions” which starts with the mission statement of the OECD which repays some attention:

“Pursuant to Article 1 of the Convention signed in Paris on 14th December 1960, and which came into force on 30th September 1961, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) shall promote policies designed: —

to achieve the highest sustainable economic growth and employment and a rising standard of living in Member countries, while maintaining financial stability, and thus to contribute to the development of the world economy;”

This got me thinking as to how the current work and stance of the OECD stands against this mandate?

The “In it together” OECD 2015 report states “Income inequality in OECD countries is at its highest level for the past half century.” and “Uncertainty and fears of social decline and exclusion have reached the middle classes in many societies.”

The question this poses for me, having seen how the OECD works, is how much is it addressing that part of its mandate “to achieve the highest sustainable economic growth and employment and a rising standard of living in Member countries,” in its policies and priorities?

Something to ponder.

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